Arts & Entertainment

Selbyville teen to compete in Miss Hispanic pageant

Coastal Point • Laura Walter: For her pageant platform, Ana Calles encourages people to volunteer for the causes they love.Coastal Point • Laura Walter: For her pageant platform, Ana Calles encourages people to volunteer for the causes they love.Ana Calles doesn’t mind driving two hours to Wilmington every week this summer. Hailing from Selbyville, she’s the only downstate contestant in the Miss Hispanic Delaware pageant.

“Honestly, it’s a big honor, and I feel very fortunate and blessed,” said Calles, 17. “I see how I’m the only one from lower Delaware. I don’t see that as an inconvenience to go all the way up there. I see it was an opportunity or a blessing. I think it’s special because it makes me stand out.”

She will represent Mexico in the Aug. 26 program, which celebrates Hispanic culture and is also designed to help young ladies develop poise and communication skills.

As a rising junior at Indian River High School, Calles said she has wanted to join the pageant for several years now. Calles has lived in Selbyville all her life, except for a few years in Mexico when she was younger.

She has the drive to compete, even hiring Uber rides to Wilmington, until teacher Lori Hudson put an end to that. Then, Hudson personally drove Calles to rehearsals and helped her with program sponsorships.

“She helps me with my schooling and everything. She’s really awesome, to be honest,” Calles said of Hudson. “She definitely goes out of her way, and she’s really there for me — almost in a way a mother would.”

The pageant began in 1972 and is celebrated with the Wilmington Hispanic Festival.

Cooks and books have a tasty time at Selbyville library

Coastal Point photos • Laura Walter: Cathy Martin serves chicken curry, next to a dish of chicken meatballs with smoked paprika tomato sauce.Coastal Point photos • Laura Walter: Cathy Martin serves chicken curry, next to a dish of chicken meatballs with smoked paprika tomato sauce.Libraries were never this delicious. But now people are turning on their tastebuds at the Selbyville Public Library.

Every month, the Eat & Greet Cookbook Club tries recipes from a new cookbook. Beforehand, anyone in the community can choose a recipe from a cookbook featured at the library. All the participants prepare a dish, and then they share a potluck dinner on the second Monday of each month. That night, people get to sample everyone’s cooking and take home the recipes.

It’s always a chance to try something new, and the group couldn’t name a recipe that they didn’t like.

In August, they tried “The Whole30 Cookbook,” a low-carb, high-flavor program by Melissa Hartwig. Recipes ranged from a classic slow-cooker chicken salad to an adventurous tomato-coconut curry chicken.

“I’m a basic person. This is my first time having [spaghetti] squash and cauliflower rice,” said librarian Ronshell “Shelly” Purnell, who roasted flavorful chicken thighs that night.

Sometimes it’s an intimate handful of cooks, while other nights are packed with a dozen or more cooks and dishes.

“It’s a nice way to meet people in your community,” said Cathy Martin. “It’s fun to get together and talk—”

“Food!” Dottie Kauffman interjected.

Shakespeare’s ‘Hamlet’ making its way to Freeman Stage

The Brown Box Theatre Project will perform Shakespeare’s “Hamlet” at the Freeman Stage on Thursday, Aug. 31, at 7 p.m.

Photography contest to illustrate what family means to you

Brandywine Living at Fenwick Island is holding a photography contest for photographs that portray family life, as part of its celebration of National Assisted Living Week.

Entries should portray a moment that illustrates “what family means to you,” as Brandywine Living’s theme for this year’s National Assisted Living Week is “Family is forever.”

Delaware Federation says ‘it’s not your grandmother’s club’

Coastal Point • Submitted: The Salt Air Gardeners are members of the Delaware Federation of Garden Clubs. The club won an award from DNREC for their plantings at the Indian River Lifesaving Station earlier this year.Coastal Point • Submitted: The Salt Air Gardeners are members of the Delaware Federation of Garden Clubs. The club won an award from DNREC for their plantings at the Indian River Lifesaving Station earlier this year.Calling all gardeners and wannabe landscapers — the Delaware Federation of Garden Clubs is looking for you.

Next Wednesday, Aug. 30, the Delaware Federation of Garden Clubs will be hosting an informational meeting regarding joining or starting a garden club. The membership event will be held at the South Coastal Library in Bethany Beach from 6 to 7 p.m.

“There are so many new communities here, and I don’t even think they know that we exist down here,” said Lisa Arni, president of the federation. “I am finding through the Master Gardeners and other organizations that people are moving here and saying, ‘OK, I bought this new house and have the builder’s minimal package of plants, and I don’t know what to plant here because I’m new to Delaware.’

“They’d be really good candidates because they just moved here, they don’t know anybody, they would make new friends and learn about what to plant in their communities and in their gardens.”

Coastal Towns Historic Homes Tour to debut Oct. 7

Coastal Point • Submitted: The guest cottage behind the Selby Evans House was built around 1887.Coastal Point • Submitted: The guest cottage behind the Selby Evans House was built around 1887.The Ocean View Historical Society will host its inaugural Coastal Towns Historic Homes Tour on Saturday, Oct. 7, featuring a number of historical homes in the area. One of the featured homes is located a 41 West Avenue in Ocean View. Selby Evans and his wife, Elizabeth Hall Evans, were the first residents of the picturesque colonial style home, which is currently owned by their great-granddaughter Barbara Slavin.

A letter from Selby to his son James mentions the lumber was purchased in Frankford for $300. While the house was originally just a parlor and dining room with two bedrooms above, indoor plumbing and a new kitchen were added in 1935. The first kitchen is now a guest house open for viewing in the landscaped back yard, which includes a gazebo and several cozy seating areas. Inside the home, original artwork abounds, including a Laura Hickman painting of the Evans-West House across the street, where James Evans lived after he married Mary West.

Local talent in the bandstand spotlight for a night

Both Bethany Beach residents and visitors who signed up to perform in the annual talent show are predicted to exceed expectations this year.

Film to document how action sports keep people sober

Get stoked: Sober athletes are working on a documentary about using action sports, arts and other outlets to have fun while staying sober.

Scott French and Eugene Stiltner co-founded “Sober and Stoked,” “the movie, movement and mindset.”

“We want to inspire people and spread the message that being sober is fun,” said Stiltner.

Glass, metal and family

Maid on the Moon to showcase work at boardwalk arts festival

Coastal Point photos • Darin J. McCann: Katie Kirk and Michael Owens, a father daughter team, pose with some of their stained glass artwork in their Millville studio.Coastal Point photos • Darin J. McCann: Katie Kirk and Michael Owens, a father daughter team, pose with some of their stained glass artwork in their Millville studio.Along with pet rocks and puka shells, artistic releases for people became very popular in the 1970s.

Ceramics and string-art classes became “fad-ulous,” as people were exploring different ways to express themselves. For instance, Michael Owens decided he wanted to tackle learning the art of stained glass as a hobby in 1975. One night, when his wife, Mary, was grading school papers, Michael asked her to draw up a crescent moon with an Indian maiden’s face on it.

“She’s like… yeah, here,” said Michael, imitating a busy person rushing through something to placate the requestor. “It was a ‘get-out-of-here’ type of thing — and that became our logo. That was in 1976.”

Mary was an accomplished painter, said Michael, and he would get her help on designs for his stained glass projects. Their routine continued, and Michael was eventually able to give up his full-time job and just focus on his art, spending 12-hour days in his studio in the couple’s detached garage.

Seining the bays with the CIB: Finding meaning on the shore

I stand thigh-deep in warm bay water, seining net clutched in my hands. I can feel the drag of the current against the fabric as I march, slowly and steadily, toward the shore. A man named Dennis Bartow holds the other end of the 30-foot net, slogging his way toward the beach with me. It’s perfect weather: sunny enough to warm my baseball cap, with a gentle breeze that smells of salt.

Infamous Stringdusters bringing bluegrass to Dewey Beach

Coastal Point • Submitted/Scott McCormick: The Infamous Stringdusters are set to appear on stage at the Bottle & Cork in Dewey Beach on Sunday, Aug. 20.Coastal Point • Submitted/Scott McCormick: The Infamous Stringdusters are set to appear on stage at the Bottle & Cork in Dewey Beach on Sunday, Aug. 20.When The Infamous Stringdusters take the stage at the Bottle & Cork in Dewey Beach on Sunday, Aug. 20, they will bring bluegrass that soars beyond the typical boundaries of the genre.

While the five-man band has its roots in the bluegrass that emerged in the 1960s folk-music movement, guitarist Andy Falco said told the Coastal Point this week that, as a band, the Stringdusters strive to explore the depth and breadth of bluegrass.

The Infamous Stringdusters is, in addition to Falco, Andy Hall on dobro, Chris Pandolfi on banjo, Jeremy Garrett on fiddle and Travis Book on upright bass. The band is currently touring in support of its latest recording, “Laws of Gravity,” which was released in January.

As their seventh studio set, “Laws of Gravity” represents the Stringdusters’ efforts to balance their appeal to fans of traditional bluegrass with a push to attract new listeners.

What’s the story?

Book shop tells tales in Ocean View

Coastal Point • Laura Walter: Turning Pages Book Lounge gives new life to used books and invites customers to come in and relax and enjoy the books.Coastal Point • Laura Walter: Turning Pages Book Lounge gives new life to used books and invites customers to come in and relax and enjoy the books.Grab a book, a coffee or a ukulele. (Maybe one of each.)

Kate and Brendan Heneghan are inviting people to start a new chapter at the new Turning Pages Book Lounge in Ocean View. The couple are selling used books, as well as comic books, music records, ukuleles and art.

In the old wooden shopping center across from Lord Baltimore Elementary School, they wanted to create a warm, open and inviting space that encourages browsing, without the clutter. This summer, they added vibrant turquoise paint, some couches and book shelves to a former T-shirt printing shop.

Customers are already spreading the word about the tiny Route 26 book shop that opened during Memorial Day weekend, where they curled up on the sofa with a $4 novel and bought a tea, coffee or soda.

‘Mermaids’ swimming in to Bethany for book signing

Coastal Point •Submitted: Nancy Sakaduski goes all out to promote her new book, ‘The Mermaid in Rehoboth Bay.’ Above right, the book, itself.Coastal Point •Submitted: Nancy Sakaduski goes all out to promote her new book, ‘The Mermaid in Rehoboth Bay.’ Above right, the book, itself.Children will get a chance to meet two “mermaids” during a book signing that will take place this Saturday, Aug. 12, at noon in Bethany Beach.

Tidepool Toys & Games, located on the boardwalk in Bethany and in Fenwick Island, has been hosting a number of local artists and authors so that children and their families can interact with them and get their books signed.

The authors hosted from in and around Sussex County have included picture-book author Michelle Meadows and will soon include Nancy Sakaduski of Lewes.

“We like to spotlight our local authors and entertainers in our toy store,” said owner Lori Smyth.

Sakaduski is the author of several books designed to appeal to audiences from children to adults, but for her signing at Tidepool Toys & Games, she will be featuring her latest children’s book, “The Mermaid in Rehoboth Bay.”

Magee Farms to host first Watermelon Festival this Saturday

UPDATE: The festival has been canceled due to weather.

Watermelon — that sweet, juicy, slice of summer goodness — will be celebrated on Saturday, Aug. 12, at Magee Farms in Selbyville, at the farm’s first-ever Watermelon Festival.

The event, set for noon to 3 p.m., will be held rain or shine, according to Heather Hastings, Magee Farms’ event coordinator.

Delmarvalous Dolls to bring Andrews Sisters’ music to life in Ocean View

UPDATE: This concert has been rescheduled to Sept. 9.

Coastal Point • Submitted : The Delmarvalous Dolls will be performing at the John West Park in Ocean View on Saturday, Sept. 9, at 6 p.m.Coastal Point • Submitted : The Delmarvalous Dolls will be performing at the John West Park in Ocean View on Saturday, Sept. 9, at 6 p.m.Offering free entertainment for the Ocean View community, introducing a glimpse into the World War II era and eliminating the musical barrier among different generations, the Town of Ocean View this week will present the Delmarvalous Dolls, an Andrews Sisters tribute band, as its fifth concert of the summer.

From 6 to 8 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 9, the band of seven musicians will perform a variety of music from the 1940s, such as swing and jazz, in front of an audience of about 300 people.

While Pam Miller, Rhonda Apple and Ev Cook sing, David Zipse will play the bass and keyboard, Dean Haemal will play the drums, Jim Miller will play the trumpet and Cody Leabal will play the saxophone.

Town Clerk Donna Schwartz said the songs from the Delmarvalous Dolls’ performance will educate younger folks about the music of that time period while creating a nostalgic experience for individuals from that generation.

Nature center offers free programs to help families explore Delaware

In order to spread education and awareness about the Inland Bays and wetlands in the Delaware area so that the public is compelled to explore, appreciate and preserve their surroundings, the Bethany Beach Nature Center offers interactive and hands-on programs for locals and visitors of all ages.

New venture raises the horns to Sussex County mead-making

Special to the Coastal Point • Christina Weaver : JR Walker and Jon Talkington, owners of The Brimming Horn Meadery in Lewes.Special to the Coastal Point • Christina Weaver : JR Walker and Jon Talkington, owners of The Brimming Horn Meadery in Lewes.Brimming Horn Meadery recently opened on Route 9, west of Lewes. Although locally-owned craft breweries and wineries are now commonplace in Sussex County, the Brimming Horn is the only meadery in Delaware south of Wilmington.

One of the challenges for business partners Jon Talkington and J.R. Walker is to introduce mead — the oldest known alcoholic beverage in the world — to many people who have never even heard of it.

Mead is basically the result of fermenting honey and water. Primitive people probably came across it accidentally after bees settled in a hollow tree and then their honey was exposed to rain. A 7,000-year-old drinking bowl containing actual remnants of mead was discovered in China. As is the nature of humans to improve upon what nature provides, mead has been continuously enhanced with yeast, fruit, herbs, flowers ever since.

Although mead is consumed around the world, and is especially enjoyed in Ethiopia, where it is called “tej,” the drink is most commonly associated with Nordic countries, their culture and mythologies. According to Talkington, the symbol for the Brimming Horn itself is a horn overflowing with mead — also known as “the nectar of the gods” and ‘the drink of kings.” A brimming horn would be passed amongst friends and kinsmen to drink, boast, make oaths and bond people together.

Magician Will Fern appearing at Dickens Parlour Theatre

Coastal Point • Submitted: Will Fern will be performing at Dickens Parlour Theatre through Aug. 15.Coastal Point • Submitted: Will Fern will be performing at Dickens Parlour Theatre through Aug. 15.In a dimly lit parlor in Millville, six clocks are displayed proudly in separate glass cases. Although the disarming little room is full of antique clocks, fortune-telling devices and other Victorian odds and ends, the clocks are unlike others.

They are unlike any others, in fact — because the clocks, designed by Jean-Robert Houdin in the mid-19th century, are the world famous “Mystery Clocks.” And this little group of six, displayed in the Dickens Parlour Theatre in Millville, is one of the largest known collections of Mystery Clocks in the nation.

With delicate glass faces and intricate gold hands and bases, the clocks defied logic by functioning without any visible apparatuses to control them. The little machines would tick away without the aid of gears or levers, and they quickly became a sensation.

St. Ann’s Bazaar ready to sell ‘millions’ of items

Hundreds of community members and visitors alike look forward each year to the Parish of St. Ann’s Bazaar, which is celebrating its 37th year in 2017.

The bazaar will be held this weekend, with its traditional premier night on Thursday, Aug. 3, from 4 to 8 p.m. With a $5 donation, attendees that night can get first dibs on the thousands of items for sale — from toys to housewares, small appliances to furniture.

The bazaar has no admission charge during its hours on Friday, Aug. 4, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday, Aug. 5, from 9 a.m. to noon.

Those who attend can also purchase barbecue donated by Bethany Blues and baked goods made by the church’s own parishioners.

Boardwalk buddies create upbeat daily tradition

Special to the Coastal Point • Lilly Blomquist Some of the boardwalk buddies gather on the boardwalk, under the clock.Special to the Coastal Point • Lilly Blomquist Some of the boardwalk buddies gather on the boardwalk, under the clock.Waves crashing against the shore and seagulls cawing in the air are not the only sounds and sights that fill the town of Bethany Beach each morning. Augmenting these daily components of the beach, a group of about 13 men spend every morning chatting with one another about a variety of topics, exchanging jokes and greeting residents and visitors.

All year ’round, except in snow or heavy rain, from around 6 or 7 a.m. until about 9:45 a.m., the men sit on the benches underneath the iconic clock on the boardwalk, beginning their days with sea breeze, sunshine and social interaction.

Setting the tone for the rest of their day, the meetings leave the group members in high spirits, which is why the men said they find themselves continuing to congregate on the boardwalk every day.