Arts & Entertainment

Bethany announces summer bandstand season

Special to the Coastal Point • Submitted: The Bethany Beach bandstand consistently packs in healthy crowds for its popular summer series.Special to the Coastal Point • Submitted: The Bethany Beach bandstand consistently packs in healthy crowds for its popular summer series.The Town of Bethany Beach will once again entertain the masses on its bandstand starting in June.

“We start looking at bands the second the previous season ends,” said Julie Malewski, events director for the Town, which also does an annual survey of visitors to get suggestions for bands they’d like to see.

“Usually, we hold off booking until we get the surveys back, but we’re always scouting new bands to refresh the lineup every year. Even though we start looking in the fall, we tend to wrap by January so we can start sending in our contracts by February.”

There will be 50 entertainment groups gracing the bandstand this season, beginning on June 9.

Malewski said 15 cover bands will perform on the bandstand, nine of which have previously played to Bethany crowds.

Local drum circle aiming to ‘Raise the Vibration’

A local drumming group is hoping to expand its circle on Sunday, April 2, when Made By Hand International Co-op in South Bethany will host the group, inviting anyone who wants to come and see what drumming circles are all about.

The face and voice of Delmarva news

John B. Greenberger was ‘Delmarva’s Walter Cronkite’

Special to the Coastal Point • Christina Weaver: Bruce Mears holds a newspaper article about his grandfather, John B. Greenberger.Special to the Coastal Point • Christina Weaver: Bruce Mears holds a newspaper article about his grandfather, John B. Greenberger.“This is the 7 p.m. edition, WBOC-TV News, and once again I say, ‘I am John B. Greenberger. It’s a good evening.’”

Lifelong local residents may recognize that sign-off as the one they heard every evening until 1975 when families congregated around their television to watch Delmarva and then national TV news. Greenberger was the local voice and face of Delmarva news from 1940 on the radio and subsequently from 1954 on both radio and television.

“Walter Cronkite followed my grandfather on CBS every evening,” said Millville’s Bruce Mears. “In fact, they resembled each other and had the same perfectly enunciated tone of voice. Around here, he was known as ‘Delmarva’s Walter Cronkite’ and was quite the local celebrity.”

John Massey, 93 and a regular visitor at the Roxana Cheer Center, was asked, out of the blue, about John B.:

IR Live! presents a musical of the decades

Live music is a hallmark of Indian River High School productions, and the students are ready to impress once again.

This year’s musical revue is IR Live! presents “The Corner Club on Baker Street,” featuring an original script by music director Nathan Mohler and student T.J. Oxbrough.

Performances are Friday and Saturday, March 24 and 25, at 6:30 p.m. Tickets cost $5 per person.

April 2 ‘Dancert’ to benefit local musician with cancer

Lovestock: a Cancer Benefit “Dancert” for John “Taco” Wroten, drummer of the local classic-rock band Hooverville, will be held Sunday, April 2, from 2 to 8 p.m. at American Legion Post 2 in Dover.

Wroten, 62, was recently diagnosed with Stage 4 tongue cancer and is currently receiving treatment, which is limiting his ability to perform with the band and at his full-time job.

Freeman Stage at Bayside announces 2017 lineup

Celebrating its 10th season bringing arts to Sussex County, the Freeman Stage at Bayside is promising to continue doing just that, and in grand style, as it announced on March 15 its summer season lineup.

What is... Delaware?

‘Jeopardy’-style trivia hitting Millsboro library

“You think you know, but you have no idea.”

While local history-hounds won’t have to phrase any answers in the form of a question, there’ll be plenty of them asked when Elkton, Md.-based storyteller Ed Okonowicz appears at the Millsboro Pubic Library for “So You Think You Know All about Delaware?” on Monday, March 20.

Local author aims to thrill readers in ‘Third Haven’

Coastal Point • Laura Walter: Selbyville author B.B. Shamp smiles with her new novel ‘Third Haven: A Novel of Deceit’ at a book signing at Energy Gym.Coastal Point • Laura Walter: Selbyville author B.B. Shamp smiles with her new novel ‘Third Haven: A Novel of Deceit’ at a book signing at Energy Gym.After an explosion shakes the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area, a woman escapes to the Eastern Shore with her young son. She spends the next 280 pages figuring out what’s happening and why an unnamed evil is following her.

Local author B.B. Shamp used bits of her own traumatic — but slightly less dramatic — experiences to inform her new book, “Third Haven: A Novel of Deceit.”

In 2008, Shamp fell off a ladder in her D.C. home. In the hospital with a broken back, she suffered a massive pulmonary embolism, then major organ failure. Doctors induced a coma, but Shamp still faced a near-death experience and saw the fabled white light.

That could be a lot to carry when a person wakes up and must re-learn how to walk and speak, hampered by PTSD and a traumatic brain injury.

Over four years, she used “Third Haven” as a map to help understand herself and bury breadcrumbs of trauma and intrigue for readers to follow that journey.

The novel’s initial explosion shakes the main character, Claire, from her everyday frustrations and tosses her into a rollicking plot that pushes her from Maryland’s Eastern Shore to coastal Delaware.

“The plot is engaging … and there are a lot of clues as to who the antagonist is,” Shamp said.

New stage on the way

Revamped Freeman stage unveils 10th-season lineup March 15

The daffodils are up, the robins have returned, the beach communities are stretching, yawning and coming back to life. Spring is right around the corner, and summer will be here before we know it. As winter ends and the sun begins to warm the sand and the fields again, there is a question crackling through offices and gyms and supermarkets...

Who’s coming to the Freeman Stage this year?

Millsboro Chamber hosting annual bridal show this Sunday

The Greater Millsboro Chamber of Commerce has couples-to-be covered this weekend, as the Chamber will host the 22nd Annual Central Sussex Bridal Show this Sunday, March 12, from noon to 3 p.m. at Cripple Creek Golf & Country Club.

“Every year, we see more vendors, new vendors who have never been in,” said Amy Simmons, the Chamber’s executive director.

Celtic music to fill library ahead of St. Patrick’s Day

Those looking for a way to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day next week can head to the South Coastal Library on March 14.

Melissa Heieie and Susan Ryan, a duo known as Willow Tree, will give a Celtic music concert that Tuesday at 2 p.m. in meeting rooms A and B.

Poker & Fun Car Rallye to benefit Justin’s Beach House

When the Poker & Fun Car Rallye V cruises out of the parking lot at Hooked Up in Millville on Saturday, March 4, drivers and their co-pilots will be armed with directions and a list of questions — and the knowledge that their trek is for a really good cause.

Anteater handbags on the red carpet?

Local entrepreneur adds anteaters to swag bags for glitzy event

Coastal Point • Submitted by Delaware Public Archives : Devon Cooper, dance instructor at X-Squad Dance Studio in Selbyville, models one of the newest handbags in the collection of Jules K. The locally-owned company sent 26 handbags to be included in ‘swag bags’ offered to Oscar nominees by a promotional firm.Coastal Point • Submitted by Delaware Public Archives : Devon Cooper, dance instructor at X-Squad Dance Studio in Selbyville, models one of the newest handbags in the collection of Jules K. The locally-owned company sent 26 handbags to be included in ‘swag bags’ offered to Oscar nominees by a promotional firm.What do anteaters and actresses have in common? The answer involves handbags, swag, a local woman’s childhood love of a certain insect-eating mammal, and a big night in Hollywood.

Ten actresses, in particular — the ones who will be vying for the Best Actress and Best Supporting Actress statuettes at Sunday’s Academy Awards in Hollywood — will receive handbags imprinted with an anteater pattern.

The bags, produced by Bethany Beach resident Julie Kypreos’ company, Jules K., are part of “Everyone Wins” promotional “swag bags” provided to Oscar nominees by the promotional company Distinctive Assets.

Through the Distinctive Assets promotion, packages of “swag” are delivered to the homes of nominees for Best Actress, Best Actor, Supporting Actress and Supporting Actor, as well as Best Director nominees and host Jimmy Kimmel.

Kypreos, whose handbags are sold online, said she came up with the idea of submitting her handbags for consideration while researching ways to get the word out about her unique handbags.

“I’m a start-up,” she said, adding that she recognizes that her handbags are so unique that they require some creative marketing. “No one is probably going to do a Google search for ‘anteater handbags,’” she said with a bit of a chuckle.

The swag bags include gifts for the nominees that range from a tube of ChapStick to a three-day stay at an 18-bedroom beachfront mansion in northern California, valued at $40,000. Kypreos’ handbags range in price from $370 to $395.

While all of the nominees for Best Director are men and, obviously, the 10 Best Actor and Best Supporting Actor nominees are men, they — as well as Kimmel — will also receive Jules K. bags. Kypreos said she tried to take the men’s significant others into consideration when choosing which bag to contribute for them, when applicable.

From Richard Allen history, a new sense of culture and community

Coastal Point • Submitted by Delaware Public Archives : A historical photo shows the Richard Allen School in 1923.Coastal Point • Submitted by Delaware Public Archives : A historical photo shows the Richard Allen School in 1923.Grade-school memories follow people through life, for better or worse. And, although the old Richard Allen School was born of segregation, people are being inspired today to transform it into a community and cultural center in Georgetown.

“When Richard Allen opened its door [in the 1920s], it was a beacon of hope for African-Americans living in Sussex County,” according to the Richard Allen Coalition. “When it reopens next year, it will welcome all of us who want to learn about the past while helping our youth explore their talents and prepare for a wonderful future.”

The non-profit Richard Allen Coalition wants to restore the school’s legacy as an educational and community center. Physically, the old building won’t just become a museum to freeze history, but a community center to breathe life into the town.

A ‘Night to Shine’

Coastal Point • Shaun M. Lambert: Ocean View Church of Christ played host to Night to Shine, a program for special-needs people 14 and older. The program was put on by the Tim Tebow Foundation and held in churches around the world on Friday, Feb. 10.Coastal Point • Shaun M. Lambert: Ocean View Church of Christ played host to Night to Shine, a program for special-needs people 14 and older. The program was put on by the Tim Tebow Foundation and held in churches around the world on Friday, Feb. 10.Last weekend, guys and gals walked the red carpet while paparazzi flashbulbs popped. It wasn’t the Academy Awards, but it was certainly a night to shine at the Ocean View Church of Christ.

Night to Shine is a program that is sponsored by the Tim Tebow Foundation, to provide an “unforgettable prom-night experience, centered on God’s love, for people with special needs ages 14 and older.”

“The church always talks about the sanctity of life, which simply means we value all life,” said the Rev. Gregg Wilgus of the Ocean View Church of Christ. “More times than not [those with special needs] are left out. It’s just meant to show those with special needs that they are loved and cared for as well.

“The truth of it is, it’s for anyone who is mentally or physically handicapped. We have 14-year-old registered, and we have a 60-year-old registered. Most of them are in their late 20s and early 30s.”

Tech comes home for the holidays

While it wasn’t my intention, I had a tech-heavy 2016 holiday season, dealing with a number of new devices and systems, despite having aimed for a relatively simple, scaled-back holiday.

Counting on kindness at Showell Elementary

PCS students wear their kindness proudly

Coastal Point • Submitted: Birannah Stevens, Ella Peterson and Edgard Chavez-Hernandez check out the bead supply while making kindness bracelets at Phillip C. Showell Elementary School.Coastal Point • Submitted: Birannah Stevens, Ella Peterson and Edgard Chavez-Hernandez check out the bead supply while making kindness bracelets at Phillip C. Showell Elementary School.Kindness can be like a rock in water. One good deed can ripple outward to distant shores.

Phillip C. Showell Elementary School celebrated January as Kindness Month by encouraging children to be kind and witness kindness in their lives.

With handmade Kindness Bracelets, students can now count and remember random acts of kindness each day.

“As they witness, give or receive an act of kindness through the day, they’ll move a charm,” said Laurie Hall, teacher of art and special education at the school. Hopefully, later, at home, “they talk about what they’ve done to move them.”

The bracelets are threaded so that people can slide the 10 beads deliberately, without them slipping backward again.

Not just tragic lovers: IRHS shows humor, flaws of 'Romeo and Juliet'

Coastal Point • Laura Walter: Cast members of Indian River High School’s ‘Romeo & Juliet’ prepare for performances on Feb. 3 and 4. In producing what may be the school’s first drama production in decades, they dropped some of the dialogue and put a modern spin on the classic.Coastal Point • Laura Walter: Cast members of Indian River High School’s ‘Romeo & Juliet’ prepare for performances on Feb. 3 and 4. In producing what may be the school’s first drama production in decades, they dropped some of the dialogue and put a modern spin on the classic.It’s either the most famous romance of all time, or the silliest. A love story between two teenagers, ages 14 and 17, “Romeo & Juliet” now has modern-day teenagers calling out their literary counterparts out for being a bit overdramatic. And Indian River High School’s new Drama Club is plunging in with its first full production, taking on William Shakespeare’s classic romantic tragedy.

To top it all off, “Romeo & Juliet,” coming at 7 p.m. on Friday and Saturday, Feb. 3 and 4, may be the first drama production at IRHS in decades. Tickets cost $5 each. Guests can bring extra money for the concession stand at intermission. Indian River High School is located at 29772 Armory Road, Dagsboro.

It’s time for IR’s “hidden talent” to display their acting skills, said English teacher and director Sadie Andros.

Catherine’s Quilting offers modern finish for age-old art form

Coastal Point photos • Tyler Valliant: Catherine Peterson grins at her family's new Selbyville quilt shop, where she helps finish new quilts and restore old ones.Coastal Point photos • Tyler Valliant: Catherine Peterson grins at her family's new Selbyville quilt shop, where she helps finish new quilts and restore old ones.Quilting may be an old art, but Catherine’s Quilting uses technology to transform the basic craft into a finished heirloom piece. Catherine and Tim Peterson just recently opened their quilt shop on Church Street in downtown Selbyville.

Quilting can be a very personal craft, whether it’s a long-term labor of love by a group of friends, or maybe one woman, perhaps given for a wedding or baby gift. Whether hand-stitched in centuries past, or by a machine today, each scrap is carefully pieced together for a grander masterpiece.

Catherine’s Quilting helps with the final steps, attaching the thick batting, which transforms a decorative sheet into a cozy blanket for the home.

Selbyville fair is ‘Just for the Health of It!’

Let’s get this new year started right!

That’s the message behind Selbyville Public Library’s upcoming health fair, Just for the Health of It! Scheduled for Saturday, Jan. 14, the event will run like an open house or trade fair. The public can come and go, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.