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D.J. Batman recounts resort life through decades of fun

As we sit in the little alley between M.R. Ducks and the Marina Deck in Ocean City, Md., about an hour before Mike “D.J. Batman” Beatty goes onstage, the longtime entertainer and occasional mischief maker recalls what brought him to the resort about 50 years ago, and how little, for him, it seemed to change during that time.

Ocean View Concert in the Park to feature Over Time

Coastal Point • Submitted: Over Time Band will be performing in the Town of Ocean View’s Concert in the Park series on Friday, July 14, from 6 to 8 p.m.Coastal Point • Submitted: Over Time Band will be performing in the Town of Ocean View’s Concert in the Park series on Friday, July 14, from 6 to 8 p.m.

Continuing their tradition of offering free entertainment in the summer months, the Town of Ocean View will host a Concert in the Park this Friday featuring the Over Time Band.

The concert will be held on June 14 from 6 to 8 p.m. in John West Park. Those attending are being encouraged to bring their lawn chairs and enjoy classic rock and popular contemporary tunes.

“They always draw a huge crowd,” said Donna Schwartz, Ocean View town clerk.

Schwartz said Boy Scout Troop 281 is going to be in attendance, selling hot dogs, sodas and water to those who want a snack. Rita’s Water Ice will also be available for purchase.

People may also pack their own picnic and take advantage of the pavilion at the park or find a nice spot on the grass.

Civil War Profiles — IR Life Saving Station keeper was a Confederate veteran

Driving north over the Indian River Bridge and continuing for about 3 miles on Route 1, you reach the restored and open-to-the-public Indian River Life Saving Station. It is preserved as a museum to educate visitors about the living and working conditions of men who often risked their lives to rescue sailors and cargo from shipwrecks off the coast of Delaware.

Barefoot Gardeners Club offering free Story Time in Fenwick

Coastal Point photos • Submitted: Susan Henickle reads a book about the American flag to the children.Coastal Point photos • Submitted: Susan Henickle reads a book about the American flag to the children.

The Barefoot Gardeners Club hosted its first Story Time in the Park of the summer season on the morning of Wednesday, July 5, at the town park adjacent to Fenwick Island Town Hall. The park features a butterfly garden, a gazebo and a playground, all of which are available to Story Time attendees.

Story Time started promptly at 10 a.m., when Susan Henickle introduced the ladies of the Barefoot Gardeners Club and politely asked the children to gather under the gazebo. The club members in attendance included Susan Henickle, Barbara McCoy, Mary Ellen Gonski, Sue Clark and Jennie Nedwick.

The July 5 Story Time combined both the club’s love for the environment and the Independence Day holiday, as the children listened to three book readings. It all began with a reading of a book about the creation of the United States’ flag. Henickle interacted with the children throughout, asking questions such as, “Who sewed the first flag?” and waiting for the children to answer.

Next, the club members transitioned away from Independence Day and brought out caterpillars in containers for the children to see. McCoy showed the children a diagram of the life cycle of a painted lady butterfly and read “The Very Hungry Caterpillar.” Following the reading, McCoy and other members of the club walked the children to the butterfly garden on the edge of the park to observe the butterflies.

It’s turtle laying season (not turtle taking-home season)

Coastal Point • Stock Photo: An Eastern Painted Turtle.Coastal Point • Stock Photo: An Eastern Painted Turtle.

I was very fortunate in late May: I found an Eastern painted turtle just finishing laying her eggs. She was one of the numerous turtles that live in our pond in our back yard. She had come up the embankment and dug herself a small hole and then laid her eggs, covered them with a mudlike mixture, and then off she went, back to the pond.

I have marked the location of the nest so we can monitor them. Last year — I actually think it was the same female — had her eggs eaten within two days. Something ate several of them the first night, and the rest were destroyed the second night.

This year, I decided I would try to protect them from predators. Supposedly, you can build a “cage” of chicken wire about 2 feet square and place it over the nest. This protects the eggs from most predators but still allows the hatchlings to escape. So far, nothing has come and disturbed the eggs this year. So, hopefully, in July or August they will hatch.

Most turtle hatchlings, unfortunately, don’t make it. And many more eggs never have the chance to hatch. Either the eggs are not fertile, are destroyed or eaten by predators, or they just don’t get the correct environment to hatch.

DelTech continues to grow student veteran services

Delaware Technical Community College is making strides for its student-veterans. Last week, the college opened its new Veterans Resource Center at its Charles L. Terry Campus in Dover — joining centers at its Stanton and Georgetown campuses.

Tripple Overtime: Michael Phelps vs. Great White Shark vs. Vegas... vs. Tripple OT?

Whenever the last Olympics was, that’s when I wrote about the time I sort-of ate sushi with Michael Phelps.

Robb, Redmond ready to drop in on Delmarva for Catch Surf Get Wet Tour

Coastal Point • File Photo: Pro surfer Kalani Robb is ready to drop in on Delmarva for the Catch Surf 'Get Wet Tour.'Coastal Point • File Photo: Pro surfer Kalani Robb is ready to drop in on Delmarva for the Catch Surf 'Get Wet Tour.'

Someone hit the Thin Lizzy on the jukebox, because come this Saturday, the boys are back in town.

After a one-year break, the Catch Surf Get Wet Tour will return to the East Coast and bring pros Kalani “The Godfather” Robb and Johnny Redmond back for the ride — the internationally renowned wave-riders set to make a pit stop in Delaware, en route to their tour appearance at K-Coast Surf Shop in Ocean City, Md., on July 15.

Back to captain the tour bus once again will be Sussex County native and Catch Surf East Coast Sales Manager Ryan Savage, ready to lead the way home after stops in Rhode Island and New Jersey to team up with local Catch Surf pros including Bill Baxter and Brian Stoehr.

Whether it’s some good old-fashioned backwoods bass fishing or firing up Baxter’s famous “winch” for a few afternoon airs at the drive-on, as always at the tour’s midway mark, the boys from “Big Sussex” will be ready to show their pals from the West Coast and North Shore another thing or two about the Slower Lower lifestyle.

Let’s hear it for the girl guards!

Coastal Point • Submitted: A mix of Fenwick Island and Dewey Beach lifeguards gather during Sussex County’s first all-women’s lifeguard competition.Coastal Point • Submitted: A mix of Fenwick Island and Dewey Beach lifeguards gather during Sussex County’s first all-women’s lifeguard competition.

Female lifeguards competed in severe weather conditions during Sussex County’s first all-women’s lifeguard competition on July 6.

The young women were set to compete on Middlesex Beach at 6 p.m. when a rainstorm hit the area. The coordinators, Middlesex Beach Patrol Capt. Justin Voorheis and Ocean City’s Sgt. Rick Cawthorn still decided to hold the event, saying they were confident that the competition would not be compromised by the weather conditions.

The women competed in six different events: the Ironwoman (a combination of running, paddling and swimming), a mile-long beach run, a run-swim-run event, a run-paddle-run event and an event called “beach flags.”

According to Voorheis, there were more than 40 guards who attended competition. The women represented patrols from Assateague Island to Rehoboth Beach.

District III champs!

LSLL Major League All-Stars clinch District III softball title

Coastal Point • Submitted: Back row: Manager Sarah Hoban, Manajha Briddell, Shania Lewis, Lanla Lewis, Olivia Rogers, Camryn Ehlers, and coaches Amy and Chad Hall. Front row; Logan Marvel, Destiny Mitchell, Kinsley Hall, Jaya Shaub, Lily Hoban and Aniyah Blake.Coastal Point • Submitted: Back row: Manager Sarah Hoban, Manajha Briddell, Shania Lewis, Lanla Lewis, Olivia Rogers, Camryn Ehlers, and coaches Amy and Chad Hall. Front row; Logan Marvel, Destiny Mitchell, Kinsley Hall, Jaya Shaub, Lily Hoban and Aniyah Blake.

The Lower Sussex Little League Major League All-Stars were off to the state tournament on Monday, June 10, after bringing home the Delaware District III softball title on Saturday, July 8, for players ages 11 and 12.

The 9-3 victory over Laurel came just one day after the squad’s 4-3 victory over that team on Friday, July 7, with Lower Sussex needing the back-to-back wins in order to clinch.

“We wanted to come out early and score first,” said LSLL head coach Sarah Hoban of Saturday’s championship game. “They put up four runs in the first inning, and I don’t think they ever let up after that, so we’re just really proud of the girls. It was a complete team effort from top to bottom.”

Working their way through the bracket, the Major League All-Stars had pulled off major victories throughout, with an 8-0 shutout over Millsboro on Friday, June 30, 17-0 shutout over Woodbridge on Sunday, June 2, and 12-2 win over Cape Henlopen on Wednesday, July 5.

Garrett Rogers takes to the field at Camden Yards

Millsboro boy injured last spring by drunken driver looks to return to play this fall

Photo courtesy of Orioles Baseball : Garrett Rogers throws out the first pitch at Camden Yards on July 1.Photo courtesy of Orioles Baseball : Garrett Rogers throws out the first pitch at Camden Yards on July 1.

For Wendy Rogers, the simple joys of summertime seem sweeter this year.

That’s because last year at this time, her son Garrett “G-Money” Rogers was recovering at A.I du Pont Hospital for Children in Wilmington from the severe injuries he sustained in a car accident. Garrett was struck by a drunk driver last May when he ran to retrieve balls during a baseball practice in Millsboro. His injuries were serious, and his future outlook was very much in question in the beginning.

“That day, I was in the helicopter; I was in the ambulance to Beebe, and I did not come home ’til August,” Rogers said. Garrett was in a medically induced coma for several weeks, allowing his brain and body to recover slowly from the trauma of the accident.

By September, though, Garrett had recovered enough to throw out the first pitch at a Delmarva Shorebirds game in Salisbury, Md. Surrounded by friends, the then-10-year-old Little League pitcher took a victory lap around the bases.

This year, with a little help from his friend and physical therapist Josh Smith, Garret upped his game a bit. On Saturday, July 1, he threw out the first ball at a Baltimore Orioles game. Again, family and friends — “a lot more than I expected” — were in stands, cheering him on, Rogers said.

It wasn’t the first time the team had reached out to the young baseball player. Immediately after the accident, baseball teams from all over the country, from Little League to pro — including the Orioles — sent photos and get-well wishes to Garrett. The support went viral on social media, with athletes and non-athletes alike sporting Garrett’s 22 jersey number and the hashtags #22 and #gmoneystrong.

Hydrate — don’t evaporate

No one needs to tell the weekly reader of Coastal Point that this region of the country can be very hot and humid in July and August. It’s one of the reasons so many people flock to our beaches. Society refers to the hottest part of the year as the “dog days” because that is when the star Sirius — the Dog Star — rises just before the sun in late July.

Millville considers annexation of proposed residential development

The Town of Millville may be growing by 31-plus acres, after receiving a Petition for Annexation submitted by Howard Robert Hickman Revocable Trust and Dr. James W. Schiff.

The property consists of 31.32 acres located at 32525 Dukes Drive, with the proposed use being a single-family-home development of 94 homes.

Hope for Dirickson Creek means volunteer action

Coastal Point • Laura Walter: U.S. Sen. Tom Carper speaks to the Dirickson Creek Team over the new State of Dirickson Creek report.Coastal Point • Laura Walter: U.S. Sen. Tom Carper speaks to the Dirickson Creek Team over the new State of Dirickson Creek report.Having lived along Dirickson Creek for 30 years, Lynn LeBrun wouldn’t let her grandchildren swim its waters anymore. In fact, anyone with an open cut risks serious bacterial infection from the waters of many parts of the Delaware inland bays. The creeks are beautiful but have serious health issues.

“I’ve been here for 30 years, and I’ve seen the creek change. The color of the water is darker. In the wintertime, you could see the bottom,” LeBrun said of a time decades ago.

“Cleaning up a water body like this is like trying to turn around an aircraft carrier,” said U.S. Sen. Tom Carper — it takes time, but it is possible.

And the movement has begun. The Dirickson Creek Team is a volunteer group that advocates for the creek and educates their neighbors and legislators. By helping protect the major local tributary, they’re hoping to impact the Little Assawoman Bay.

Delaware court honors veterans, bailiff raises donations

Coastal Point • Maria Counts: Oscar Gonzales, with his children, Diego, Niko and Henry, created a shadow box so veterans could display their awards anonymously.Coastal Point • Maria Counts: Oscar Gonzales, with his children, Diego, Niko and Henry, created a shadow box so veterans could display their awards anonymously.Prior to gaveling in the start of a Veterans Treatment Court session last week, Delaware Superior Court Judge Richard F. Stokes took time to call attention to the great work being done for veterans in Sussex County.

“A lot of good things are happening because we have a great number of people and organizations that are pitching in for our veterans,” said Stokes.

He called attention to Home of the Brave in Milford, a non-profit whose mission is to “reduce homelessness among our military veteran population,” and its executive director Jessica Finian.

Home of the Brave not only offers transitional housing for male and female veterans (along with their children), but also assists with employment, counseling services, access to healthcare, transportation and locating affordable housing.

“She has what I call a ‘can-do’ attitude,” said Stokes. “Nothing was handed to Jessica. It was her mission to establish facilities to take care of homeless veterans... It didn’t come easy. She had to go to bat several times…

“I want you to be recognized for the good work that you do,” he told her.

Also, on June 29, Stokes called out the efforts of Superior Court Chief of Security Rene Flores Sr., who served in the U.S. Army and Air Force reserve, beginning his military career in 1987. Flores retired as a senior master-sergeant, having been deployed in various combat areas, including Afghanistan and Iraq.

Flores reached out to his colleagues throughout Georgetown to collect a great many household goods, a “wish-list of items,” to donate to Home of the Brave.

Police, fire, EMS train together for the unthinkable

Coastal Point • Tyler Valliant: First-responders take advantage of hands-on training for active events. The training took place at Lord Baltimore Elementary School, and is designed to incorporate all elements of responders working as a team to save lives.Coastal Point • Tyler Valliant: First-responders take advantage of hands-on training for active events. The training took place at Lord Baltimore Elementary School, and is designed to incorporate all elements of responders working as a team to save lives.Lord Baltimore Elementary School was quite busy last week. The school was not filled with young kids, but rather a slew of emergency-services personnel who were getting hands-on training for critical situations.

“Rescue Task Force training is, in the event of any active violence event — whether it’s a shooting, a bombing, vehicle-borne attack, whatever it is — EMS can integrate with the police officers and provide medical care to the injured more quickly,” explained Andrew Vickers of the Sussex County Paramedics.

Vickers said that, in the past, EMS would wait in a staged area while police officers cleared an area of a threat completely, before allowing medical help to enter.

“What we’ve learned is a lot of lives have been lost because we were waiting,” Vickers said. “The thought process is we could train the police officers to do medical care, but they don’t do it every day. We want to get the best medical care to the patient as quickly as possible.”

Editorial — Addiction, problems at jails, are connected entities

Gov. John Carney signed a $4.1 billion budget for the 2018 fiscal year on Sunday night, and while people will no doubt scrutinize, argue and complain about nearly every line item approved, there were two elements that received extra attention that are particularly worth noting.

Point of No Return — Independence Day brings food dependence

Well, the Fourth has come and gone, and seemingly taken away any shred of dignity I had left with it.

Letters the Editor — July 7, 2017

Church sign gets scrutiny, explanation

(Editor’s note: The following letter was addressed to the Rev. Dr. Kyung-Hee Sa, district superintendent of the Peninsula-Delaware Conference of the United Methodist Church, regarding Providence United Methodist Church in Georgetown, and was sent to the Coastal Point for publication.)

Kingsley Orchards revives blueberry farm

Coastal Point • Tyler Valliant: From left, Anchors Aweigh Entertainment owners Jason and Summer Phillips are working with Kingsley Orchards owners Tony and Meghan Morgan on hosting a Family Fun Day at the orchards this weekend.Coastal Point • Tyler Valliant: From left, Anchors Aweigh Entertainment owners Jason and Summer Phillips are working with Kingsley Orchards owners Tony and Meghan Morgan on hosting a Family Fun Day at the orchards this weekend.For years, Frankford’s old fruit farm was a jungle of weeds set among the cornfields on Blueberry Lane. Only the birds and the locals knew that, somewhere under the tangle, blueberries were still a hidden treasure.

But now, Kingsley Orchards has re-opened the beloved blueberry patch once known as Ryan’s Berry Farm. The farm had changed hands several times before the Meghan and Tony Morgan family picked it up at a 2016 sheriff sale.

Kingsley is an old family name that stems from Meghan’s paternal family tree. The husband-and-wife team began clearing the land that fall, and Kingsley Orchards opened in mid-June as a you-pick blueberry farm with a retail storefront. So people can venture into the fields or quickly swing by the retail store.

Tony Morgan regularly buys and flips land from sheriff sales. But housing developments flew out of his mind when he actually saw the blueberry bushes, curtained by 10 years of weeds and trees.

O.C. museum offers free summer programs

Visitors can learn about surf-fishing; Ocean City, Md. history; rigging a fishing line; knot tying; sea life; beach safety; and sharks during the Ocean City Life-Saving Station Museum’s annual summer educational programs, which continue until Aug. 26.

Most of the free 30-minute programs will take place on the Boardwalk at the tram station, just north of the museum, at 10 a.m.

Civil War Profiles — Divulging military intelligence is rewarded

The Confederate prisoner population at Fort Delaware more than doubled following the three days of battle at Gettysburg beginning July 1, 1863. An estimated 6,000 Rebel soldiers captured on those bloody fields were processed at POW “depots” near Gettysburg, and interrogated for useful tactical information about Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia before traveling by foot, trains and boats to Pea Patch Island in the middle of the Delaware River.

International students get a taste of a true beach-town activity

Coastal Point • Tyler Valliant: International students gather at Bethany Surf Shop’s Ocean View outlet location for a paddleboarding excursion on the Assawoman Canal on Wednesday, June 28. Coastal Point • Tyler Valliant: International students gather at Bethany Surf Shop’s Ocean View outlet location for a paddleboarding excursion on the Assawoman Canal on Wednesday, June 28. Students from an array of different countries were challenged to show their balancing abilities during a paddleboarding event last Wednesday.

St. Martha’s Episcopal Church, along with Bethany Surf Shop owner Jim McGrath, decided that, this year, they would hold a free paddleboarding lesson and tour for the foreign students living and working in the area over the summer.

The surf shop held three paddleboarding opportunities for the students at its outlet location in Ocean View, on Tuesday and Wednesday mornings at 9 a.m., as well as Wednesday evening at 5 p.m. It turned out that morning wasn’t a popular time for the students. According to instructor Madison Lively, no one showed up to the event on Tuesday and only a few came on Wednesday morning.

“It’s really upsetting when they don’t show up,” she said.

State park to celebrate 50th anniversary and Sandcastle Contest

Coastal Point • Submitted: These campers pitched tents at the old Key Box campground.Coastal Point • Submitted: These campers pitched tents at the old Key Box campground.Delaware Seashore State Park is inviting visitors and local residents of all ages and skill levels to participate in the 37th Annual Sandcastle Contest at the South Inlet Day Area on Saturday, July 8.

In honor of the state park’s 50th anniversary and another year of sculpting sand creations, the contest will enable participants to celebrate traditions while reminiscing on past memories formed at the park.

To partake in the beach activity, sandcastle building competitors can register at the South Inlet Day Area on the day of the event, beginning at 9:30 a.m. They can register in either the 12-or-younger category or the open-class category for all ages.

Once participants have registered, they will then embark on their quest of designing and sculpting their sandcastles, with whatever tools and sand toys they bring, until judging begins at 1 p.m. Officials with Delaware Seashore State Park will evaluate the creations what is expected to be a couple hundred participants and give out prizes, such as $100 gift cards from local restaurants, home furnishings and sunglasses.

MGT & Co. Toggery bringing luxury brands from land and sea to Fenwick Island

Coastal Point • Tyler Valliant: Michael Thanner and ‘Gracie’ are bringing some land and sea style to Fenwick Island.Coastal Point • Tyler Valliant: Michael Thanner and ‘Gracie’ are bringing some land and sea style to Fenwick Island.Dress like John F. Kennedy. Speak like Ernest Hemingway. Work like Ralph Lauren. And party like Gatsby.

That’s the mantra of Michael Thanner and the MGT & Co. Toggery, which recently launched in Fenwick Island to offer the “Low Country” a taste of the high life when it comes to premier men’s clothing and the latest in luxury fashion.

While the Ralph Lauren lifestyle and fictitious Jay Gatsby may have been a very real inspiration for Thanner and his new experience-centered men’s boutique, catering to weddings in West Egg isn’t the only focus at MGT & Co.

Whether it’s picking up a dress shirt from Mizzen+Maine for dinner at Just Hooked right next door or a pair of swim trunks from Rhythm for trying to hook dinner at the drive-on beach across the street, the Toggery aims to keep their wide-range of customers covered, literally, with everything from headwear to footwear.

“We’ve got everything you could need from head to toe — there’s something for everyone,,” Thanner said. “It’s classic, it’s American and it’s simple, but at the same time, it’s very unique.”

It was through his various travels that Thanner formed the concept behind what’s become an eclectic selection of contemporary classics at MGT & Co.

Beach & Bay Cottage Tour Sneak Peek No. 10 — Dream home in North Bethany

Coastal Point • Submitted: A platform bed and whitewashed reclaimed wood are featured in the master bedroom of this builder’s home.Coastal Point • Submitted: A platform bed and whitewashed reclaimed wood are featured in the master bedroom of this builder’s home.(Editor’s note: This is the 10th in a series of previews of the homes that will be on display during the 26th Annual Beach & Bay Cottage Tour, to be held July 26-27, from 9:30 a.m. until 4 p.m.)

This local builder’s dream since college was to live east of Route 1 in North Bethany. She finally made it in 2016, with the construction of her 6,500-square-foot, six-bedroom home in North Bethany, just a short block from the beach.

The house has been filled with family members and friends ever since.

The inverted floor plan offers privacy and space for both her and her guests, with a main living area separating their quarters from hers. The master suite tops it all, with an ocean view retreat that includes a fireside sitting room and an expansive marble master bath. The beach-themed décor is both casual and classic. Touches include numbered dining chairs, a scattering of colorful surfboards and a game room with a custom pool table designed by the owner.

‘Release the Kraken!’

Viking Mini Golf adds 19th hole, more mythology to ‘Fenwick Boardwalk’

Coastal Point • Tyler Valliant: The new 19th hole features ‘The Kraken’ from Scandinavian mythology (but it also kind of looks like the Coastal Point • Tyler Valliant: The new 19th hole features ‘The Kraken’ from Scandinavian mythology (but people say it also kind of looks like the "Star Wars" monster, too...)There may be plenty of mythology surrounding the course, but for decades, Viking Golf has been a very real fixture on the outskirts of Fenwick Island.

Whether it’s conquering 18 holes of Viking-style mini-golf, heading for the finish line at the Go-Kart track, splashing down at Thunder Lagoon waterpark, or just grabbing some boardwalk-style french fries; there’s always been something new at the “Fenwick Boardwalk.”

“The boardwalk was always here, really. First, we had some little shacks — there was a flower shop and a seafood place and a T-shirt shop, things like that,” said Jon Andersen, who, along with his brother, Tor, and business partner, Pete, took over ownership from his father, Bjorn, after he passed away. “But every couple of years, it seems like we’re doing something new.”

After renovating the greens and adding two brand new holes to the course this off-season, this summer will be no exception, as Viking Golf gets ready “release the Kraken” on Fenwick Island.

Pickleball Points - So what’s the pickle about all these paddles?

Coastal Point • SubmittedCoastal Point • SubmittedFor pickleball, your equipment needs are simple.

You need sport shoes with smooth tread for tennis-type courts, because running shoes on court surfaces can abruptly terminate your forward progress, ending in a nasty fall. Think about getting a pair of inexpensive sport goggles, because sometimes an errant ball might be attracted to your eyes or nose, and wear old, loose sports clothing because you soon will be ready to buy a smaller size.

Now, let’s talk about the paddle.

Like many of you, I first bought two of those wooden paddles, and they soon became very expensive firewood. I should have known better. I spent a lifetime developing and marketing tennis rackets using the same materials used in pickleball paddles, and I am even confused today when I go to the Internet to determine paddle playability differences.

Contractors for a Cause, OVHS team up on project

Two local non-profits are coming together to bring history to life, benefitting the community in the process.

Top 10: Local OM team makes a big splash at world finals

It was a worldwide honor for some of Indian River School District’s most creative students recently, as a middle-school team placed in the Top 10 at Odyssey of the Mind World Finals.

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