Front Page

Selbyville teen to compete in Miss Hispanic pageant

Coastal Point • Laura Walter: For her pageant platform, Ana Calles encourages people to volunteer for the causes they love.Coastal Point • Laura Walter: For her pageant platform, Ana Calles encourages people to volunteer for the causes they love.Ana Calles doesn’t mind driving two hours to Wilmington every week this summer. Hailing from Selbyville, she’s the only downstate contestant in the Miss Hispanic Delaware pageant.

“Honestly, it’s a big honor, and I feel very fortunate and blessed,” said Calles, 17. “I see how I’m the only one from lower Delaware. I don’t see that as an inconvenience to go all the way up there. I see it was an opportunity or a blessing. I think it’s special because it makes me stand out.”

She will represent Mexico in the Aug. 26 program, which celebrates Hispanic culture and is also designed to help young ladies develop poise and communication skills.

As a rising junior at Indian River High School, Calles said she has wanted to join the pageant for several years now. Calles has lived in Selbyville all her life, except for a few years in Mexico when she was younger.

She has the drive to compete, even hiring Uber rides to Wilmington, until teacher Lori Hudson put an end to that. Then, Hudson personally drove Calles to rehearsals and helped her with program sponsorships.

“She helps me with my schooling and everything. She’s really awesome, to be honest,” Calles said of Hudson. “She definitely goes out of her way, and she’s really there for me — almost in a way a mother would.”

The pageant began in 1972 and is celebrated with the Wilmington Hispanic Festival.

Civil War Profiles — Preserving Civil War lands for future generations

Three decades ago, a number of concerned citizens gathered together to address the problem of urban sprawl in Northern Virginia. The focus of their attention was the fast disappearing Civil War battlefields that were being turned into housing developments and shopping malls.

Bringing the ‘wow’ factor

Pizzazz features unique décor and gifts in Fenwick

Coastal Point • Tyler Valliant: Pizzazz by the Bay owner Victoria Thanner in her Fenwick Island shop.Coastal Point • Tyler Valliant: Pizzazz by the Bay owner Victoria Thanner in her Fenwick Island shop.This tiny shop in Fenwick Island is living up to its name. Pizzazz by the Bay isn’t trying to be the ordinary gift shop. Visitors and locals are coming there to find eclectic gifts and home décor by local artists.

Never behind the counter for very long, Victoria Thanner greets every customer with a smile. She loves being right there, helping them find the perfect item, or picturing it in their home.

With so many people still building and renovating in coastal Delaware, “I want to do something different … showcase local artists and pieces,” Thanner said. “People are looking for that ‘wow’ piece.”

Some of the more striking sculptures begin with driftwood: a gentle curving sailboat, a rough sea turtle and tall lamps strung with Edison bulbs and ship’s rope.

Cooks and books have a tasty time at Selbyville library

Coastal Point photos • Laura Walter: Cathy Martin serves chicken curry, next to a dish of chicken meatballs with smoked paprika tomato sauce.Coastal Point photos • Laura Walter: Cathy Martin serves chicken curry, next to a dish of chicken meatballs with smoked paprika tomato sauce.Libraries were never this delicious. But now people are turning on their tastebuds at the Selbyville Public Library.

Every month, the Eat & Greet Cookbook Club tries recipes from a new cookbook. Beforehand, anyone in the community can choose a recipe from a cookbook featured at the library. All the participants prepare a dish, and then they share a potluck dinner on the second Monday of each month. That night, people get to sample everyone’s cooking and take home the recipes.

It’s always a chance to try something new, and the group couldn’t name a recipe that they didn’t like.

In August, they tried “The Whole30 Cookbook,” a low-carb, high-flavor program by Melissa Hartwig. Recipes ranged from a classic slow-cooker chicken salad to an adventurous tomato-coconut curry chicken.

“I’m a basic person. This is my first time having [spaghetti] squash and cauliflower rice,” said librarian Ronshell “Shelly” Purnell, who roasted flavorful chicken thighs that night.

Sometimes it’s an intimate handful of cooks, while other nights are packed with a dozen or more cooks and dishes.

“It’s a nice way to meet people in your community,” said Cathy Martin. “It’s fun to get together and talk—”

“Food!” Dottie Kauffman interjected.

Shakespeare’s ‘Hamlet’ making its way to Freeman Stage

The Brown Box Theatre Project will perform Shakespeare’s “Hamlet” at the Freeman Stage on Thursday, Aug. 31, at 7 p.m.

Photography contest to illustrate what family means to you

Brandywine Living at Fenwick Island is holding a photography contest for photographs that portray family life, as part of its celebration of National Assisted Living Week.

Entries should portray a moment that illustrates “what family means to you,” as Brandywine Living’s theme for this year’s National Assisted Living Week is “Family is forever.”

Delaware Federation says ‘it’s not your grandmother’s club’

Coastal Point • Submitted: The Salt Air Gardeners are members of the Delaware Federation of Garden Clubs. The club won an award from DNREC for their plantings at the Indian River Lifesaving Station earlier this year.Coastal Point • Submitted: The Salt Air Gardeners are members of the Delaware Federation of Garden Clubs. The club won an award from DNREC for their plantings at the Indian River Lifesaving Station earlier this year.Calling all gardeners and wannabe landscapers — the Delaware Federation of Garden Clubs is looking for you.

Next Wednesday, Aug. 30, the Delaware Federation of Garden Clubs will be hosting an informational meeting regarding joining or starting a garden club. The membership event will be held at the South Coastal Library in Bethany Beach from 6 to 7 p.m.

“There are so many new communities here, and I don’t even think they know that we exist down here,” said Lisa Arni, president of the federation. “I am finding through the Master Gardeners and other organizations that people are moving here and saying, ‘OK, I bought this new house and have the builder’s minimal package of plants, and I don’t know what to plant here because I’m new to Delaware.’

“They’d be really good candidates because they just moved here, they don’t know anybody, they would make new friends and learn about what to plant in their communities and in their gardens.”

Coastal Towns Historic Homes Tour to debut Oct. 7

Coastal Point • Submitted: The guest cottage behind the Selby Evans House was built around 1887.Coastal Point • Submitted: The guest cottage behind the Selby Evans House was built around 1887.The Ocean View Historical Society will host its inaugural Coastal Towns Historic Homes Tour on Saturday, Oct. 7, featuring a number of historical homes in the area. One of the featured homes is located a 41 West Avenue in Ocean View. Selby Evans and his wife, Elizabeth Hall Evans, were the first residents of the picturesque colonial style home, which is currently owned by their great-granddaughter Barbara Slavin.

A letter from Selby to his son James mentions the lumber was purchased in Frankford for $300. While the house was originally just a parlor and dining room with two bedrooms above, indoor plumbing and a new kitchen were added in 1935. The first kitchen is now a guest house open for viewing in the landscaped back yard, which includes a gazebo and several cozy seating areas. Inside the home, original artwork abounds, including a Laura Hickman painting of the Evans-West House across the street, where James Evans lived after he married Mary West.

SODE athletes enjoy classic summer-camp experience

Coastal Point • Shaun M. Lambert: Special Olympics Delaware Summer Camp attendees try their hands at archery.Coastal Point • Shaun M. Lambert: Special Olympics Delaware Summer Camp attendees try their hands at archery.Approximately 120 Special Olympics Delaware (SODE) athletes from across the state were able to enjoy a classic summer-camp experience this month at Camp Barnes near Bethany Beach.

“This is the 17th camp,” said Jon Buzby, director of media relations for SODE, who also helped start the camp. “When we started it 17 years ago, we developed it to truly fit into our mission, which is sports training. So, the athletes, when they came here, we did sports — we did volleyball, we did soccer, we did bocce, we did basketball. Everything we did was something they trained and competed in during the year.

“As time went on, what we realized is we were limiting the population that could come to camp because it was so strenuous, as the sports we were offering were more of our high-level sports. “

Buzby said the change-over to the typical summer experience was gradual, but while it was happening, the camp also grew.

BREAKING: Fenwick cancels public hearing on election rules

The Fenwick Island Town Council has canceled its Aug. 25 public hearing and the council’s final vote on voter qualifications. In fact, the primary sponsor, Councilwoman Julie Lee, said she has decided to hit “pause” altogether on the proposed charter amendment. She said she may move to rescind the first reading from July.

Hall’s Store closer to becoming reality with help of Contractors

Coastal Point • Maria Counts: Contractors for a Cause recently donated $3,000 to the Ocean View Historical Society.Coastal Point • Maria Counts: Contractors for a Cause recently donated $3,000 to the Ocean View Historical Society.The Ocean View Historical Society is hoping to begin construction on its replica of Hall’s Store — a re-creation based on the general store that “gave rise” to the town of Ocean View — very soon, thanks to the continued support of Contractors for a Cause. The resulting structure will be a visitor’s center and education center, housing local artifacts, a meeting room, kitchenette and restrooms.

On Aug. 17, Mark Hardt, a charter member of and director of scholarships and membership for Contractors for a Cause, as well as co-owner of Miranda & Hardt Contracting, presented the society with a check for $3,000 from the non-profit.

Having a blast

Delaware Burn Camp offers kids a week of summer fun

For children who have experienced a serious burn, the emotional recovery from that burn can take just as long, if not longer, to heal than the actual wound itself.

A total eclipse of the… sun

This coming Monday, everyone will be given the opportunity to experience a unique and rare happening — a total solar eclipse.

A solar eclipse occurs when the moon passes directly between the sun and the Earth, casting a shadow onto Earth.

South Bethany council rejects police claims

The South Bethany Town Council has found “no merit” to police officers’ claims of improper promotion, pay and benefits.

In a June 30 letter, the town’s six fulltime police officers alleged that they have not been paid or promoted as they should be.

Area prepares for annual Warrior Beach Week

In a little more than two weeks, the Bethany Beach area will welcome 25 “Very Important Families” for a week of rest and healing.

Local talent in the bandstand spotlight for a night

Both Bethany Beach residents and visitors who signed up to perform in the annual talent show are predicted to exceed expectations this year.

Editorial — It's time to start thinking about helping kids

We may not want to admit it just yet, but summer as we know it will soon be wrapping up, and children in the area will soon be returning to their classrooms.

Point of No Return — It’s not about the parties — it’s all about the hate

On April 30, 1945, Adolf Hitler killed himself in a bunker, along with his wife of two days, Eva Braun. Reports suggest both of them took a cyanide pill to avoid being captured by Soviet troops who were moving in on their position, and Hitler finished the job on himself with a self-inflicted gunshot to the head.

Sussex County drug-trafficking investigation nets 40 arrests

A multi-jurisdictional investigation into an illegal drug trafficking organization, involving multiple subjects, conducted by the Delaware State Police and Delaware Department of Justice, has concluded with the arrest or indictment of 40 individuals on more than 190 criminal charges.

Arrests made in lawn ornament thefts

Following the receipt of numerous complaints regarding stolen lawn ornaments, the Ocean View Police Department and Delaware State Police Troop 4 were recently able to arrest Randy P. Holderbaum and Matthew L. Donoway, both of Frankford, in connection to the crimes.

Film to document how action sports keep people sober

Get stoked: Sober athletes are working on a documentary about using action sports, arts and other outlets to have fun while staying sober.

Scott French and Eugene Stiltner co-founded “Sober and Stoked,” “the movie, movement and mindset.”

“We want to inspire people and spread the message that being sober is fun,” said Stiltner.

Community helping local kids with school supply drives

Nowadays, “school supplies” are more than just pencils and paper. And some families have trouble affording all the crayons, scissors, binders, index cards and more needed for a successful school year — not to mention a quality backpack to carry everything.

This month, people can donate to local school supply drives, which directly help local children and teens.

Glass, metal and family

Maid on the Moon to showcase work at boardwalk arts festival

Coastal Point photos • Darin J. McCann: Katie Kirk and Michael Owens, a father daughter team, pose with some of their stained glass artwork in their Millville studio.Coastal Point photos • Darin J. McCann: Katie Kirk and Michael Owens, a father daughter team, pose with some of their stained glass artwork in their Millville studio.Along with pet rocks and puka shells, artistic releases for people became very popular in the 1970s.

Ceramics and string-art classes became “fad-ulous,” as people were exploring different ways to express themselves. For instance, Michael Owens decided he wanted to tackle learning the art of stained glass as a hobby in 1975. One night, when his wife, Mary, was grading school papers, Michael asked her to draw up a crescent moon with an Indian maiden’s face on it.

“She’s like… yeah, here,” said Michael, imitating a busy person rushing through something to placate the requestor. “It was a ‘get-out-of-here’ type of thing — and that became our logo. That was in 1976.”

Mary was an accomplished painter, said Michael, and he would get her help on designs for his stained glass projects. Their routine continued, and Michael was eventually able to give up his full-time job and just focus on his art, spending 12-hour days in his studio in the couple’s detached garage.

Dinker-Irvin Cottage listed on National Register of Historic Places

Coastal Point • Submitted: The Dinker-Irvin cottage was moved earlier this year to its new location a few lots west. The cottage was recently placed on the National Register of Historic Places.Coastal Point • Submitted: The Dinker-Irvin cottage was moved earlier this year to its new location a few lots west. The cottage was recently placed on the National Register of Historic Places.Bethany Beach officials and former owners Christina and Clem Edgar were notified recently that the Dinker-Irvin Cottage has officially been listed in the National Register of Historic Places as of July 3.

The cottage, which was recently moved onto a Town-owned lot a few doors down the street from its nearly century-long location on Garfield Parkway Extended, was built by the Dinker family during the early days of the town’s founding and had previously served as the local post office for several years after its relocation to the Garfield Parkway Extended lot in the 1920s.

The Dinker-Irvin Cottage is in the process of being transformed into a town history museum and is now officially recognized by the U.S. Department of the Interior as being part of that history itself.

“By this action, the Dinker-Irvin Cottage was recognized as being significant to the history of the Town of Bethany Beach, Sussex County, and the State of Delaware,” the announcement from Timothy A. Slavin, director of the State of Delaware’s Historical & Cultural Affairs department and state preservation officer.

Seining the bays with the CIB: Finding meaning on the shore

I stand thigh-deep in warm bay water, seining net clutched in my hands. I can feel the drag of the current against the fabric as I march, slowly and steadily, toward the shore. A man named Dennis Bartow holds the other end of the 30-foot net, slogging his way toward the beach with me. It’s perfect weather: sunny enough to warm my baseball cap, with a gentle breeze that smells of salt.

Maryland man takes home $1.6M in White Marlin Open

Coastal Point • File photo: The crew of the Rock Doc shows off some of their haul at last year’s White Marlin Open. Pictured are Matthew, Tyler and Tim Tribbitt, Jerry Mieklejohn, Cory Lednum, Ryan Savage and Captain Bob Wiggins.Coastal Point • File photo: The crew of the Rock Doc shows off some of their haul at last year’s White Marlin Open. Pictured are Matthew, Tyler and Tim Tribbitt, Jerry Mieklejohn, Cory Lednum, Ryan Savage and Captain Bob Wiggins.When an 86-pound white marlin came to Harbour Island Marina on 14th Street last Wednesday, Aug. 9, the smart money figured the odds of it taking the top prize were better than good, even with two days remaining in the 44th annual White Marlin Open.

And they would have been right were it not for Glen Frost of Stevensville, Md., who, as far as odds go, had to be one of the more unlikely winners of the tournament in some time.

First, he landed a 95.5-pound white marlin to win the Open and more than $1.6 million on Friday, the last day of fishing. Secondly, it was his first marlin catch ever, and third… more on that later.

“If I was a betting man, which I’m not, I would have sworn 86 pounds would hold,” said Jim Motsko, White Marlin Open founder and co-director. “Yeah, I was surprised.” The 95.5-pounder “was a big, fat fish. It’s the third-heaviest ever in 44 years.

Pickleballers practice hard ahead of three-team match

Coastal Point • Submitted: Team Captain Randy Redard of Suss-exfactor is second from left, standing, while team captain Bob O’Malley of Ocean Pines is in the last row on the right. The doubles pair that won most matches was Don Tome of Ocean Pines, on the far left, standing, and paCoastal Point • Submitted: Team Captain Randy Redard of Suss-exfactor is second from left, standing, while team captain Bob O’Malley of Ocean Pines is in the last row on the right. The doubles pair that won most matches was Don Tome of Ocean Pines, on the far left, standing, and paWe formed the Delmarva Team Pickleball League earlier this year, and there are now three teams: Ocean View Crew, Bob O’Malley’s Ocean Pines and Randy Redard’s Suss-exfactor. By this date next year, we hope to have six teams from across Delmarva.

The idea is to create an environment with the mental and physical demands of competitive match conditions.

Of course, there are more practices than individuals might organize on their own, and practice is the best way to advance your game in any sport.

I know that several weeks before a team match members of Ocean View Crew, including Steve Melofchik, can be seen spending longer training sessions at World Gym in Ocean View, which proves that this retired athletic director practices what he once taught.

Georgetown 5K to raise funds for Ballard Memorial Fund

This Sunday, the friends and family of late Delaware State Trooper Cpl. Stephen Ballard are sponsoring a 5K and “Kiddie K” in order to raise funds for the fallen trooper’s family.

Infamous Stringdusters bringing bluegrass to Dewey Beach

Coastal Point • Submitted/Scott McCormick: The Infamous Stringdusters are set to appear on stage at the Bottle & Cork in Dewey Beach on Sunday, Aug. 20.Coastal Point • Submitted/Scott McCormick: The Infamous Stringdusters are set to appear on stage at the Bottle & Cork in Dewey Beach on Sunday, Aug. 20.When The Infamous Stringdusters take the stage at the Bottle & Cork in Dewey Beach on Sunday, Aug. 20, they will bring bluegrass that soars beyond the typical boundaries of the genre.

While the five-man band has its roots in the bluegrass that emerged in the 1960s folk-music movement, guitarist Andy Falco said told the Coastal Point this week that, as a band, the Stringdusters strive to explore the depth and breadth of bluegrass.

The Infamous Stringdusters is, in addition to Falco, Andy Hall on dobro, Chris Pandolfi on banjo, Jeremy Garrett on fiddle and Travis Book on upright bass. The band is currently touring in support of its latest recording, “Laws of Gravity,” which was released in January.

As their seventh studio set, “Laws of Gravity” represents the Stringdusters’ efforts to balance their appeal to fans of traditional bluegrass with a push to attract new listeners.

Syndicate content