PCS students painting for the stars

Date Published: 
May 12, 2017

Coastal Point photos • Submitted: Jeremy Hill, Madelyn Clattenburg and Everett Hall enjoy painting their bees on the nose cone.Coastal Point photos • Submitted: Jeremy Hill, Madelyn Clattenburg and Everett Hall enjoy painting their bees on the nose cone.Local elementary-school students’ artwork could someday be described as “out of this world,” as first-graders at Phillip C. Showell Elementary School were invited in April to paint the top of a sounding rocket. Around 4 feet tall, the nose cone would be attached to the top of a small rocket that carries experiments into the atmosphere, collects data and falls back to earth within 30 minutes.

According to art teacher Laurie Hall, a Selbyville resident who judged the school science fair also works at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. Soon after the fair, he invited the first-grade students to help paint a nose cone.

Each PCS student painted a bumblebee on the hive-shaped metal chunk.

Bees have become a school mascot, encouraging students to “Bee responsible, bee respectful, bee positive, bee safe.”

“There can be so many great partnerships formed,” Hall said. “Everybody in the community has something to give or share. You never know who’s living here and what they can bring to the students and the school … [to] help enrich their education.”

Will the hand-painted creation find its place among the stars? Maybe. Even Wallops personnel can’t guarantee it’ll actually be used for a mission.

But the students and teachers at PCS can still dream. They might even hang their wish on a shooting star.