Dollars & Sense

Pa. Powerball winners claim $72M from winning local ticket

A couple from Pennsylvania started 2017 with a $121.6 million prize after matching all five white balls plus the red Powerball in the Dec. 17 lottery drawing. The man and woman, who wished to remain anonymous, purchased the winning ticket at Selbyville Goose Creek, a subsidiary of Cato Gas & Goose Creek Food Stores, located at 38452 DuPont Boulevard in Selbyville.

Bearhole Farms gives a whole new look to farming

Coastal Point • Kerin Magill: Cindy Stevens and C.J. Mears display some of the produce they have grown through aquaponic farming.Coastal Point • Kerin Magill: Cindy Stevens and C.J. Mears display some of the produce they have grown through aquaponic farming.At the entrance to a greenhouse at Bearhole Farms near Roxana sits a blue tank about the size of a small hot tub. Orange-finned flashes flit around the bottom and a pump emits a constant thrum.

“That’s the engine,” says Bear Hole proprietor Cindy Stevens. The heart of the engine, which produces a perpetual harvest of 3,000 lettuce plants inside the 1,700-square-foot greenhouse, is fish. About 350 koi, common goldfish and channel catfish, to be precise.

In addition to swimming around the tank, the fish eat... and then when that food turns to fish waste, it is released into a system of channels that run under the lettuce plants, watering and feeding the plants. It’s the perfect symbiotic relationship.

Pie expanding, Artful Bean looking for new home

As soon as the New Year, part of Bethany Beach will have a new look, with Pie restaurant owners Dan Lewis and Robin Rankin and Artful Bean owners Rose O’Hanlan and Kim Warner reaching an agreement last week that would allow Pie to expand, while the Artful Bean looks for a new home.

The future is still bright at Miken

Coastal Point • Darin McCann: Mike Cummings, center, with sons Sean and Patrick, look toward the future with Miken Builders.Coastal Point • Darin McCann: Mike Cummings, center, with sons Sean and Patrick, look toward the future with Miken Builders.There was a look of pride on the face of Mike Cummings as he sat in his conference room earlier this week.

The driving force and CEO of Miken Builders in Millville was enjoying the fact that his company was celebrating 30 years of doing business, and that their spinoff, BetterLiving of Delmarva, was in its eighth year of constructing sunrooms, porch enclosures and awnings.

He was proud of the fact that his average employee has worked with Miken for more than 10 years, that he has worked with Contractors for a Cause for nearly 20 years and was actively involved in the construction of Justin’s Beach House — the respite home in Bethany Beach for families affected by cancer. And he was most certainly proud of the two young men who shared the conference-room table with him.

Patrick is the sales manager at BetterLiving, and Sean is a project manager for Miken. They are both well-versed in the ways of Miken and know that each project they take on must live up to the high standards long-attributed to the company.

Today & Tomorrow Conference returns to Sussex County

The Sussex County Today & Tomorrow Conference was held last week, with the mission of providing “insight and identify opportunities in Sussex County to promote economics, partnership and collaboration.”

Micheal Meoli, owner/operator of The Meoli Companies, was the conference’s keynote speaker, and discussed what it takes to be successful in business.

Chamber celebrates 40 years of serving local businesses

Coastal Point • Submitted: Past presidents of the Bethany-Fenwick Area Chamber of Commerce got together last week to celebrate the Chamber’s 40th anniversary.Coastal Point • Submitted: Past presidents of the Bethany-Fenwick Area Chamber of Commerce got together last week to celebrate the Chamber’s 40th anniversary.It started, as do many things in small towns, with a conversation at the post office. Then there came a letter from the CIA.

And with that, 40 years ago, the Bethany-Fenwick Area Chamber of Commerce was born.

So says the organization’s first president, Clayton Ringler. Now 87 years old and living in Hayesville, NC, Ringler fondly recalled the chamber’s early days in a phone conversation last week.

The post office conversations, Ringler said, led to meetings of the first of the chamber’s organizers at Murray’s Topside Restaurant in Ocean View. Soon, the local newspaper, the Delmarva News, picked up on the chamber’s formation and published an article about it.

That’s where that letter comes into play. It was actually from Odette May, who at the time worked for the Central Intelligence Agency but was looking to retire in Bethany Beach. May, it seems, had seen the newspaper article and was writing to tell Ringler she wanted to get involved in the chamber.

Cottage Café and 16 Mile team up for ‘second-season’ specials

Coastal Point • Tyler Valliant: 16 Mile ‘Beer Slinger’ Joe Botchie and Cottage Café/Bethany Boat House Bar Manager Melanie Petrie show off some of 16 Mile’s signature beers in front of the Cottage Café in Bethany.Coastal Point • Tyler Valliant: 16 Mile ‘Beer Slinger’ Joe Botchie and Cottage Café/Bethany Boat House Bar Manager Melanie Petrie show off some of 16 Mile’s signature beers in front of the Cottage Café in Bethany.Over the course of the past 22 years, the Cottage Café restaurant near Bethany Beach has more or less written the book for “the second season.”

Shoulder-season specials — including the Friday fish fry, Monday fried oysters and the always-popular roast turkey dinner on Sundays — have long been tradition for a legion of the area’s locals, and a way for the restaurant and pub to not only stay open throughout the winter but to show appreciation for the community that helps make it all possible.

While they’ve nailed that recipe down practically to a science after nearly two decades of R&D, this off-season, they’re cranking things up to 11 by teaming up with 16 Mile Brewery.

“It was like a match made in heaven,” said Cottage Café business manager Tom Harman, with a laugh, of when 16 Mile “Beer Slinger” Joe Botchie first came down to meet with Cottage Café/Bethany Boathouse bar manger Melanie Petrie and the rest of the Cottage crew.

Pin Up Girls Salon set and styling in Ocean View

Coastal Point • Tyler Valliant: From left, owners and stylists Angela Hutton, Amy Smith, and Kira DiSabatino recently launched Pin Up Girls Salon in Ocean View.Coastal Point • Tyler Valliant: From left, owners and stylists Angela Hutton, Amy Smith, and Kira DiSabatino recently launched Pin Up Girls Salon in Ocean View.It was their moment.

So much so that, on the morning of Aug. 25, upon entering the newly renovated space above Ocean Vayu Yoga and Pivot Physical Therapy, on what was to be the day of their grand opening, Angela Hutton, Amy Smith and Kira DiSabatino — the proud new owners of Pin Up Girls Salon in Ocean View — took full advantage of it, very literally jumping for joy to mark both the occasion and the milestone.

“I won’t lie — we walked in this morning, and we just collided and hugged. We acted like a bunch of little girls, screaming,” said Hutton with a laugh. “It feels amazing. It finally feels like we’re at home.”

PUG’s three co-owners may be embarking on a brand new venture but they are by no means strangers to the scissors and chair, each with an extensive salon résumé, having worked together at a salon in Millville for the past seven years. That’s where they not only honed their craft, but spent days dreaming about eventually going out on their own.

Town Center Market brings food and goods to the center of Bayside

Coastal Point photos • Submitted: Bikes, ready to rent from Fenwick Bike Shop are available at the Town Center Market in Bayside. Coastal Point photos • Submitted: Bikes, ready to rent from Fenwick Bike Shop are available at the Town Center Market in Bayside. This summer brought a new addition to the bustling Bayside community near Fenwick Island, with the incarnation of the Town Center Market.

The open-air pop-up market is open from 4 to 7 p.m. on Thursdays and Fridays, and from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Saturdays, until Labor Day weekend. With vendors changing every night, homeowners and visitors are being treated to a rotation of local artisans, businesses and food trucks.

According to Bayside Director of Marketing Jeff Evans, the market was conceived out of the desire to “enhance the experience for the community” by bringing offerings from local businesses to residents.

“It was Michelle Freeman’s vision to provide some retail opportunities here in Bayside,” Evans said.

This summer, the idea was to bring a temporary, open-air market to the community, with the hope of eventually evolving it into a permanent retail space within the community.

Red Barn offers a crazy-quilt of furniture and collectables

Coastal Point • Kerin Magill: Tom Wilhoit, Robyn Wilhoit and Eric Moyer keep the Red Barn resale shop stocked with goodies.Coastal Point • Kerin Magill: Tom Wilhoit, Robyn Wilhoit and Eric Moyer keep the Red Barn resale shop stocked with goodies.Whether someone is looking for a special piece of furniture, a unique something to fill that corner in their beach house or just want to feel like they’re in Grandma’s attic for a little while, the Red Barn in Dagsboro could be just the ticket.

Robyn and Tom Wilhoit, the new owners of the Clayton Avenue resale shop, are settling into their first summer at the 100-year-old building. With goods literally hanging from its well-aged rafters, the couple said they finally feel like they have sufficient space to spread out and properly showcase the wide variety of items they have gathered.

Native Delawareans, the Wilhoits began their resale shop adventure after years in other fields. Initially, they opened Three Good Things in Oak Orchard — and quickly realized they needed more space.

“We outgrew the building on Route 24 in about three months,” Tom Wilhoit said.

When they were looking for a new spot, the Red Barn stood out because of its history, and because it offered three times the space of the Three Good Things spot, he said. As it turned out, one of the Wilhoits’ mentors in the resale business, George Ritter, was an owner of the former business located in the Red Barn.

New owner continues traditions, adds new menu at Ocean View Seafood

Coastal Point photos • Shaun M. Lambert: Jennifer Wojcik, center, and the new crew at Ocean View Seafood gather outside the shop.Coastal Point photos • Shaun M. Lambert: Jennifer Wojcik, center, and the new crew at Ocean View Seafood gather outside the shop.Jennifer Wojcik knows fish.

Since moving to the area some 20 years ago, if she wasn’t working behind the bar, she had most likely gone fishing.

In fact, just last year, Wojcik and her crew on the Reel Passion even took first place in the Wahoo Division at the annual Poor Girl’s open in Ocean City, Md.

So when Ocean View Seafood went up for sale this past spring, with owners Dave and Beth Long ready to retire, combining her love of fishing with her experience in customer service just made sense.

“It worked out perfect. The place found me,” said Wojcik, who has been the proud new owner of Ocean View Seafood since purchasing the business in May.

“I’m lucky enough that the Longs chose me. I want to make sure that I do the best I can. It’s a family-run business.”

Fenwick native bringing Delaware Apparel to the masses

Special to the Coastal Point • Submitted: Pete ‘Pierson’ Roenke sits in his office while dealing with his business, Delaware Apparel.Special to the Coastal Point • Submitted: Pete ‘Pierson’ Roenke sits in his office while dealing with his business, Delaware Apparel.He may be in California, but Pete “Pierson” Roenke’s heart will always be in southern Delaware; and he has just launched a new business to pay tribute to his roots in the First State.

Delaware Apparel is an internet-based company that sells T-shirts, hats, jackets and stickers with Delaware-related slogans. The company has also been featured in “pop-up” displays at local stores, including the Lululemon outlet in Rehoboth Beach.

Roenke, a 2007 graduate of Indian River High School, grew up a few yards from the ocean in Fenwick Island, with all that entails — surfing, bodyboarding and just enjoying the beach lifestyle. He graduated from Virginia Tech in 2011 and joined the U.S. Marines that same year.

Passing the ‘barre’

Former lawyer launches Bethany’s first exclusive studio with Beach Barre Body

Coastal Point • Tyler Valliant: Guest barre-tender Kolby Scott, front, instructs a class at Beach Barre Body in Bethany while Marni Gorman, second from left, and Emma Sheain, third from left, get a workout.Coastal Point • Tyler Valliant: Guest barre-tender Kolby Scott, front, instructs a class at Beach Barre Body in Bethany while Marni Gorman, second from left, and Emma Sheain, third from left, get a workout.Linda Durfee sat in her car in front of the newly-opened Beach Barre Body studio in Bethany Beach, trying to work up the nerve to go in. Through the car’s windshield, she watched all of the 20-, 30- and 40-somethings walk through the door with only the workout clothing on their backs and seemingly without another thought.

Now in her 70s, she wondered if she could, too.

“I was sitting in the parking lot. My husband brought me down here, and I said to him, ‘OK —take a look at all those young bodies. I’m not going in there!” Durfee recalled with a laugh. “It’s kind of intimidating to walk into it.”

However, just like most newcomers to the growing exercise movement simply known as “barre,” despite her initial concerns, once she went in for one workout, she was hooked.

‘A country setting at the beach’

Woodsong Inn aims to be relaxing retreat and venue

Coastal Point • Tyler Valliant: Innkeeper Debbie Keefe (left) and co-owner Jane Errett Vincenti smile in the lobby of Woodsong Inn and Retreat near Assawoman Wildlife Refuge.Coastal Point • Tyler Valliant: Innkeeper Debbie Keefe (left) and co-owner Jane Errett Vincenti smile in the lobby of Woodsong Inn and Retreat near Assawoman Wildlife Refuge.A tree-lined driveway leads to Woodsong Inn & Retreat. It rests on a quiet back road. No one drives there unless they’re looking for the peaceful bed-and-breakfast near Roxana and Ocean View.

But that countryside seclusion makes the inn and event venue special, said co-owner Jane Errett Vincenti. Although she’s originally from Chester County, Pa., Vincenti’s family still owns the Bethany Beach cottage her ancestor, William Russell Errett, built around 1902 when helping to develop the new town.

Now, less than seven miles from Bethany Beach and Fenwick Island, Woodsong’s two buildings are hosting everything from quiet weekend getaways to full weddings and parties.

“It is so relaxing back here,” said Debbie Keefe, innkeeper at the grassy, waterside property at 37269 Dirickson Creek Road, Frankford.

Three Blonde Bakers serving up Vanderwende’s, fudge

Coastal Point photos • R. Chris Clark: The Three Blonde Bakers, from left, Brittany, Ann and Cassidy Baker — gather in front of their new shop in Bethany Beach.Coastal Point photos • R. Chris Clark: The Three Blonde Bakers, from left, Brittany, Ann and Cassidy Baker — gather in front of their new shop in Bethany Beach.It was late last spring when Brittany Baker returned home from Puerto Rico, expecting to tend to someone else’s bar.

Spending the better part of her life’s so-far quarter-century in South Bethany, and after graduating from the University of Delaware, it was just something that she had always done — sticking together a routine résumé of winter world travel and growing up on sunny-season jobs along the Bethany boardwalk, swirling Dickey’s Frozen Custard, working at Breakers Surf Shop and slinging gin at area restaurants.

Then, she got a phone call.

“It was very random,” Baker said of the unexpected suggestion from long-time friend Erin Ternahan — whose family owns Breakers and, at the time, also owned the shop adjacent, formerly known as “The Parlour.”

“We were kind of joking — she was like, ‘Buy it — we’ll be neighbors. It’ll be like old times — like we’re 14 again.’”

No longer 14, when Baker brought the idea up to her parents, Ken and Ann Baker, one supper-night, it didn’t seem as funny as it did functional.

The family had long been bouncing around ideas for a business in their hometown, never quite finding one cooked with enough consistency to stick to the fridge until that night, when that one finally did.