To Your Health

‘O’ you should Positive-ly donate to Blood Bank of Delaware

Imagine giving birth to a first child. It should be the happiest day of one’s life. Now, imagine an unforeseen complication that causes the mother to lose so much blood she needs a 400-unit transfusion.

While some may say, “This will never happen to me,” each year 5 million Americans need a blood transfusion.

County previews RapidSOS emergency location tech

Coastal Point • Submitted : RapidSOS co-founder Michael Martin makes a test call at the Sussex County Emergency Operations Center as EOC Director Joe Thomas observes.Coastal Point • Submitted : RapidSOS co-founder Michael Martin makes a test call at the Sussex County Emergency Operations Center as EOC Director Joe Thomas observes.An estimated 240 million calls are made to 911 in the United States each year. Sussex County officials are considering adopting a new technology that would cut down emergency response time when seconds really do count.

Last week, the Sussex County Emergency Operations Center hosted a team from RapidSOS to test the company’s new technology, which uses GPS data to help better pinpoint a caller’s location.

“When you call from a landline, you get the billing address for the phone line. But, obviously, the billing address for your cell phone isn’t very helpful, so that is where the infrastructure hasn’t been able to keep pace with the evolving technology,” explained Michael Martin, cofounder of RapidSOS. “This will become one of the first centers in the country to have this embedded in their system.”

Joe Thomas, director of the EOC, said having such technology would be great, especially as eastern Sussex County has a high tourist population in the summer months.

Frankford youth ask for help on skatepark

Five boys were skateboarding in the Frankford fire hall parking lot in the minutes before the Frankford Town Council’s meeting was to begin just down the street on May 1.

By the time the meeting began, the boys were seated in the back row of the council chambers, skateboards at their feet.

Hike down memory lane: South Bethany opens history trail

South Bethany is mapping a history trail for all to see.Coastal Point • Laura Walter:  South Bethany Historical Society President Bob McCarthy displays a historical photo of South bethany at the dedication of the Town’s new Trail of History.Coastal Point • Laura Walter: South Bethany Historical Society President Bob McCarthy displays a historical photo of South bethany at the dedication of the Town’s new Trail of History.

Residents gathered at Richard Hall Memorial Park on April 21 to unveil South Bethany’s new Trail of History.

“The fact that you’re here means South Bethany is your own very special part of the earth,” Councilwoman Sue Callaway told the crowd on Earth Day weekend.

The project was a partnership between the Community Enhancement Committee and South Bethany Historical Society.

Starting in the east, five signboards tell South Bethany’s story through the years, from the first purchase of coastal land in the 1950s and quest to incorporate as a town, into the 21st century.

It got conversation buzzing. At each stop, people found photographs of familiar faces and homes. They remembered the canals before bulkheads, docks and regulations; stories of town politics; and swimming in the canals.

“It’s great that you guys found a wonderful place for this,” said Historical Society President Bob McCarthy, who remembers old debates over sewer installation, playgrounds and roads.

“People just don’t have an appreciation of how we got here today,” Callaway said.

DEA offers a safe way to dispose of those old medications

Coastal Point photos • Shaun M. Lambert: Ocean View Police Department's Capt. Heath Hall poses at the department's drug drop-off location, provided by CVS Pharmacy.Coastal Point photos • Shaun M. Lambert: Ocean View Police Department's Capt. Heath Hall poses at the department's drug drop-off location, provided by CVS Pharmacy.This Saturday, community members are being encouraged to clean out their medicine cabinets and properly dispose of medications through the U.S. Department of Justice Drug Enforcement Administration’s (DEA) National Prescription Drug Take Back Day.

“We’ve been participating in drug takeback since 2007, so this will be our 10th year,” said Ocean View Police Department Capt. Heath Hall. “They started it once a year but then started doing it twice a year, just because it was a very well accepted service. They saw the demand.”

This Saturday, April 29, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., a dozen sites in Sussex County will be open to collect any unwanted medications that members of the public no longer wish to keep in their homes.

Along with the Ocean View Police Department, other Sussex County collection sites available to the public on Saturday include the Dagsboro Police Department, the Selbyville Police Department, the Selbyville CVS Pharmacy, Delaware State Police Troop 4, the Lewes Police Department, Delaware State Police Troop 7, as well as the Rehoboth Beach, Milford, Milton and Laural police departments and the Delaware Department of Justice’s Sussex County office.

ITN Southern Delaware offers affordable, safe rides for seniors

Coastal Point • Maria Counts: ITN Southern Delaware is a community-based, community-supported, consumer-oriented, quality transportation service for seniors and adults with visual impairment.Coastal Point • Maria Counts: ITN Southern Delaware is a community-based, community-supported, consumer-oriented, quality transportation service for seniors and adults with visual impairment.For seniors in coastal Sussex County, hitching a ride from Point A to Point B can be a breeze with the transportation cooperative ITN Southern Delaware.

“This was borne out of an idea [Nancy Feichtl] had. She was approaching her senior years and wondered how she would get around. So she started exploring options for some kind of transportation options for seniors, because the alternatives are limited,” said Janis Hanwell, executive director of ITN Southern Delaware. “Through her research, she came across ITN America, a national nonprofit organization that provides transportation to seniors and adults with visual impairments.”

The Southern Delaware branch of ITN was begun in August 2015, with the first rides being provided on Dec. 1, 2015.

“At that time, we had 12, 15 active drivers and about 50 members. Today, we have close to 60 volunteer drivers and closer to 200 rider-members, said Hanwell, noting that the co-op surpassed 1,000 rides in December 2016.

Bethany Beach Nature Center to celebrate Earth Day this Saturday

While “every day is Earth Day” at the Bethany Beach Nature Center, Saturday, April 15, will be an extra-special day at the former Addy Cottage.

From 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., the center will host an early Earth Day celebration that director Nancy Lucy said will bring together entertainment and education in a way that is sure to please all its visitors.

‘You’re not the only one’

Youth grief-support services coming to Sussex County

Sussex County children who have suffered major a loss can now attend weekly grief counseling in Georgetown.

With so much public interest statewide, the nonprofit Supporting Kidds recently vowed to expand its Healing Pathways Program, and the Hockessin-based group this month is beginning bereavement counseling for children ages 5 to 18 across Delaware, now including Georgetown.

Know the basics to prevent heart disease

Heart disease remains one of the top killers of Americans. Diets high in fat and salt contribute greatly to heart disease, as does a lack of exercise and smoking.

Take the necessary steps today to prevent or improve your heart health.

Get back to basics

Physical therapy helps people afflicted with osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is one of the most pervasive health problems in the U.S. today. You may not realize it, but about 10 million people in this country have already been diagnosed with osteoporosis. Another 44 million have low bone density and are at risk.

Guest Column — The marvel of mindful eating

Starting when we are children, we learn that food tastes good. We start to explore different tastes and textures, soon learning there are foods we prefer. However, as we get older, we become more and more busy. This busyness in our lives can mean a rushed 10-minute lunch at our desk or on the road in our car. It certainly does not give us time to explore our food.

Physical therapy makes life easier for rheumatoid arthritis sufferers

If you’re one of the more than 1.5 million people in the U.S. suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA), getting through the day can be an uphill battle. It can be painful and make the simple things seem out of reach.

Local pet groomer offering pet first-aid classes

Coastal Point • Submitted: Kerrie Lynn Jones, certified groomer, certified Pet Tech instructor and owner of Wags to Riches Pet Grooming, demonstrates pet first-aid during a presentation.Coastal Point • Submitted: Kerrie Lynn Jones, certified groomer, certified Pet Tech instructor and owner of Wags to Riches Pet Grooming, demonstrates pet first-aid during a presentation.When pet groomer Kerrie Lynn Jones’ Brussels griffon choked on some cheese, she knew what to do. She began protocol she learned as part of becoming a pet first-aid instructor and helped to dislodge the grated cheese that had “coagulated” in her dog’s throat.

“I still remember the high I got off of bringing my dog back to life,” Jones said.

The owner of Wags to Riches Pet Grooming, Jones had taken a class in pet first-aid for her own information, as well as for professional reasons.

“I groom 50 animals a week,” so she thought it made sense to be prepared in case any dog ever suffered a health emergency while she was grooming it. Having had one dog “pass out on the table while I was grooming it,” Jones said she knows first-hand that emergencies can and do happen.

Now, Jones and her partner, Merry Tabetha Compton, are offering classes in pet first-aid and CPR for the public. The four-hour class covers a wide range of pet emergencies, from choking and seizures to poisoning and insect stings.

Delaware delegation, healthcare officials: Fix healthcare

For 48-year-old Nick Serratore, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) provides stability. He gets the reassurance that, someday, his emergency costs will be manageable. He has a high risk of colon cancer but visits the doctor for preventative maintenance, trying to avoid hospital stays.

Selbyville fair is ‘Just for the Health of It!’

Let’s get this new year started right!

That’s the message behind Selbyville Public Library’s upcoming health fair, Just for the Health of It! Scheduled for Saturday, Jan. 14, the event will run like an open house or trade fair. The public can come and go, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Exercise and weight loss are keys to a new you in 2017

With every new year come resolutions to get in shape and lose weight. Will this be the year that you stick to your guns and make it happen? Let’s look at why this year a new you could make a world of difference in your health and quality of life.

Delicious and nutritious eating a goal for 2017

Special to the Coastal Point • Marie Cook: Sue Steel and Erik Schreiber are fitness professionals at Custom Fit 360 in Millville. Schreiber shared his healthy recipes with Marie.Special to the Coastal Point • Marie Cook: Sue Steel and Erik Schreiber are fitness professionals at Custom Fit 360 in Millville. Schreiber shared his healthy recipes with Marie.Here we are again — another New Year! As we say hello to 2017, I’m reminded of one of the songs my husband, Jim, occasionally sings on karaoke nights — “Choices,” as sung by the late, great country singer George Jones. The opening lyrics are: “I’ve had choices since the day that I was born. There were voices that told me right from wrong. If I had listened, no, I wouldn’t be here today, living and dying with the choices I’ve made.”

It has been my tradition at the beginning of each year to write a healthy-cooking and fitness column. We all know the New Year drill. It’s about “choices.” Do I make New Year’s resolutions? Do I set goals for myself? Will this be the year that I finally _____________ (you fill in the blank)? And if I make resolutions, will this be the year that I actually succeed in keeping them?

In December 2015, I again began chemo treatments to deal with the return of my rare form of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma in both lungs. Treatments ended in April, and I’m thrilled that I am again in remission — eight months and counting.

Bearhole Farms gives a whole new look to farming

Coastal Point • Kerin Magill: Cindy Stevens and C.J. Mears display some of the produce they have grown through aquaponic farming.Coastal Point • Kerin Magill: Cindy Stevens and C.J. Mears display some of the produce they have grown through aquaponic farming.At the entrance to a greenhouse at Bearhole Farms near Roxana sits a blue tank about the size of a small hot tub. Orange-finned flashes flit around the bottom and a pump emits a constant thrum.

“That’s the engine,” says Bear Hole proprietor Cindy Stevens. The heart of the engine, which produces a perpetual harvest of 3,000 lettuce plants inside the 1,700-square-foot greenhouse, is fish. About 350 koi, common goldfish and channel catfish, to be precise.

In addition to swimming around the tank, the fish eat... and then when that food turns to fish waste, it is released into a system of channels that run under the lettuce plants, watering and feeding the plants. It’s the perfect symbiotic relationship.

Guest Column – Quite the testimonial: ‘I trust Beebe with my heart’

When Bob and Ellen Chaisson decided to retire to Lewes 17 years ago, they had never visited the region before. They wanted a nice place to live, but one that was still close enough to travel to Maryland, where they had lived for 20 years.

Blue Christmas aims to weave hope for those in need

While many look at the holiday season as a time of cheer to be shared with family and friends, there are some who do not have as joyous a time.

For those — the lost, lonely, grieving and overwhelmed — Mariner’s Bethel United Methodist Church holds its Blue Christmas, a service of hope for those in need in the community.